Comhlamh: intercultural learning and profesional advice on voluntourism


Comhlamh is an Irish organization with a great website. They developed an excellent coming home guide and plenty of other useful information such as social media guidebook for volunteers to tackle the problem that volunteers publish too often inappropriate photos or experience reports on the world wide web, which rather stigmatize the people they volunteer for.

 

Comhlámh is a great organization and platform to learn more about about volunteering and development issues. Also for volunteer sending agencies, for whom this code for good practise was developed.

The Comhlámh CoGP for Volunteer Sending Agencies is a set of standards for organisations involved in facilitating international volunteer placements in the Global South.

The focus of the Code is to ensure overseas volunteering has a positive impact for the three main stakeholders: the volunteer, the sending agency, and the local project and community.

The Code has been developed in close consultation with Irish volunteer sending agencies, returned volunteers and with a range of partners that host international volunteers. It is based on the values of sustainable development, solidarity and partnership.

Right now there are 44 organisation committed to implementing good practice through the Code. We strongly recommend that you choose one of them if you are thinking about volunteering in the Global South.

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About Sebastian Drobner

Sebastian has eight years of experience in international development cooperation, lived in five countries and on three continents. He started to get into the world of development in 2008 when he volunteered for one year in Cambodia for a local Voluntourism project. He then received a contract as an advisor through Bread for the World in Germany and supported the development of the program Volunteer Action for Cambodia by Star Kampuchea until 2012. At the same time he was responsible for the development of the government founded volunteer program Weltwärts of Bread for the World in Cambodia and it`s mentoring. From 2012 to 2013 he changed into the head office of Bread for the world where he was responsible for the administration of their volunteer program as a program assistant. Now he is studying International Social Work and Development and works part time in development projects. Part of this course was an internship in the Solomon Islands where he worked in a tourism course and developed a volunteer program for Don Bosco Technical Institute Solomon Islands. The knowledge he gained when he finished a three-year training in Hotel and tourism helped during this experience.

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